Computer Vision and Computational Neuroscience Laboratory

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eric.jpg Eric L. Schwartz is Professor of Cognitive and Neural Systems, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Professor of Neurobiology and Neuroanatomy at Boston University. He received his PhD in experimental high energy physics at Columbia University (1973), studying with Jack Steinberger. He subsequently performed post-doctoral studies in neurophysiology with E. Roy John at New York Medical College. Prior to moving to Boston University in 1992, he served as Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center and as Associate Professor of Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU.

PhD Academic Tree

domhnull.jpg Domhnull Granquist-Fraser (Don) defended his thesis in Cognitive and Neural Systems in March 2003. He earned a BSc in Engineering Physics from the University of the State of New York, Albany in 1995. Don also completed two years of graduate study in medical neuroscience at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Prior to attending Boston University, Don worked as a photonic/mechanical engineer at the University of Arizona for ten years. Don currently is a contractor at NASA Ames Research Center in California.
nbomberg.jpg Neil Bomberger is a PhD student in the Computer Vision and Computational Neuroscience Laboratory. He received a BSc in Engineering Science from the Pennsylvania State University in 1997. His research has focused on using the nonlocal filter (a fast approximation to anisotropic diffusion) for image segmentation, and on investigating mechanisms that would allow a biological visual system to implement the nonlocal filter. His research interests include image segmentation, non-classical receptive fields in visual cortex, pattern recognition, machine learning, and sensor fusion.
wagner.jpg Robert Wagner is currently a PhD student in the department of Cognitive and Neural Systems at Boston University. He received his BSc in Computer Science at Purdue University in 1989. His current research focuses on active vision for face detection and tracking on a stereo robotic head with three degrees-of-freedom. Other projects include the computation of wide-field optical flow for the recovery of egomotion parameters. His interests span visual perception, real-time image processing, visual navigation, pattern recognition, code optimization techniques, and computer graphics/animation.
lgrady.jpg Leo Grady received his BSc in Electrical Engineering at the University of Vermont in 1999. He is currently a fourth year PhD student in the Computer Vision and Computational Neuroscience Laboratory. He is interested in studying the design principles of biological systems in order to apply the techniques to current engineering problems. His research focuses on space variant machine vision and image segmentation using techniques from the graph and network theories. Although focusing more attention on the non-uniform sampling structure of the primate retina, he also considers the space variant architecture of a wide range of other species. Other interests include: pattern recognition, graph/network theory, non-uniform data processing, cellular automata, machine learning, robotics and emergent phenomena.
jonnyreb.jpg Jonathan Polimeni is a graduate student in Electrical and Computer Engineering at BU. He received his BSc degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Johns Hopkins university where he worked in the Sensory Communications and Microsystems Lab. He is currently developing computational models of large- and small-scale topography within striate and extrastriate cortex using numerical quasiconformal techniques based on human fMRI data. His research interests include numerical (quasi)conformal mapping, finite element analysis, analog VLSI, algebraic topology, topographic modeling of the neocortex, and retinotopy via fMRI.
oph.jpg Oliver Hinds is a student in the Computer Vision and Computational Neuroscience Laboratory at the Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University. He earned a BSc in Computer Science from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in 2002, and joined the CV/CNS lab in May, 2003. His research interests include investigating the structure and function of the early visual system, and using biological systems as a basis for computer and engineering applications.
wisp.jpg George Kierstein is currently a PhD student in the department of Cognitive and Neural Systems at Boston University. She studied Mathematics at the University of Warwick and received a BSc in Physics and a BSc in Mathematics from Florida Atlantic University in 1996. Most recently as Software Architect at Salient Stills Inc. where she concentrated on commercial machine vision applications (in particular producing super-resolution images from video for the Print market). Her research interests include biologically-inspired machine vision systems, image processing, software engineering, applied mathematics, and modeling of the early visual system.
storer.jpg Alex Storer is a PhD student at the Department of Cognitive & Neural Systems at Boston University. He received a BS in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and a BA in Cognitive Science from the University of California at Berkeley in 2005, and joined the CV/CNS laboratory in Summer 2006. His research interests include assistive technology and robotics.

Recent Alumni

mukundb.jpg Mukund Balasubramanian defended his PhD thesis in Cognitive and Neural Systems in September 2002 and earned his BSc in Physics and BA in Psychology from the University of Texas, Austin in 1993. His research has focused on computing minimal geodesics, flattening surfaces, and the retinotopic structure of primate visual cortex. He now works for CorTechs Labs, Inc..
gnchen.jpg Gen-Nan Chen defended his PhD thesis in Cognitive and Neural Systems in October 2001. He earned his MSc from National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan in 1993 and a BSc from National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan in 1991. His research has focused on nonuniform sampling, medical imaging, and mesh representations of images. He now works for CorTechs Labs, Inc..
rjwood.jpg Richard Wood defended his PhD thesis in Cognitive and Neural Systems in 2001 and earned his BSc and MSc in 1990 and 1992, respectively, from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, both in computer science. His research has focused on real-time space-variant active vision systems and modeling of cortical topography. He now works for Raytheon Company -- Integrated Defense Systems where he performs research on autonomous vehicles and intelligent systems. His research interests include neural modeling of visual cortex, computational neuroscience, biological and machine vision, real-time systems, and object detection and tracking.

Alumni

Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University

Name

Graduation Year

Thesis Title
Doron Tal

1997

Functional spatial architecture of orientation maps in the primate visual cortex
Giorgio Bonmassar

1997

The exponential chirp transform for log-polar sampled images
Bruce Fischl

1997

Learning, anisotropic diffusion, nonlinear filtering and space-variant vision
Douglas Greve

1995

Instrumentation and control of a miniaturized active vision system

Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University

Name

Graduation Year

Thesis Title
Pierre Landau

1993

Computer simulation of cortical polymaps
Ping-Wen Ong

1992

Image processing, pattern recognition, and attentional algorithms in a space-variant active vision system
Ben Bederson

1992

A Miniature Space-Variant Active Vision System: Cortex-I
Alan Rojer

1990

Space-variant computer vision with a complex-logarithmic sensor geometry

Former Lab Members

Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University

New York University



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